How to Put Fishing Line on a Spinning Reel

Casting a line into the water with a lure or bait at the end is a past time that many people do every year. Without a doubt, fishing can be quite enjoyable and relaxing. There are always frustrations, and one of those often is the twisting and tangling of the fishing line. This can also affect your ability to catch the big one. This is often caused by the incorrect spooling of the reel at the beginning of your trip.

Spooling your reel is the act of attaching the fishing line into the housing of the reel. This is different for each type of reel, and in this article, we will be taking a look at how to do this if you are dealing with a spinning reel. First, let’s start with what that is, and we will break down the steps to take to spool that reel efficiently.

What is a Spinning Reel? And What is it Good For?

These reels are easy to use and are great for the novice angler. The process is simple — you flip the bail, place your finger on the fishing line, and then hurl the line into the water. Then you close down the bail and begin reeling the line back in.

This is a great option for fishermen or women who want to use baits lightweight bait like live bait or lures that are made of plastic. The line itself comes off the spool, and it is not fitted with any drag restrictions. This allows for a further casting area. There is also no backlash as well.

This is great for large open bodies of water. You can use a spinner reel for any type of fishing from lakes and rivers to the ocean. This is one of the most versatile and user-friendly reel options. Now that you have a deeper understanding of the spinner reel, it is time to break down the process of spooling that reel so that you don’t have to worry about any issues arising while you are out on your next fishing adventure.

Steps to Spool a Spinning Reel

There are a few key preparation steps before you even get to the actual spooling stage. Here are all the steps from beginning to end so that you have the complete process stored in mind for when you need it.

Casting a line into the water with a lure or bait at the end is a past time that many people do every year. Without a doubt, fishing can be quite enjoyable and relaxing, though there are always frustrations, and one of those often is the twisting and tangling of the fishing line. This can also affect your ability to catch the big one. This is often caused by the incorrect spooling of the reel at the beginning of your excursion. Spooling your reel is the act of attaching the fishing line into the housing of the reel. This is different for each type of reel, and in this article, we will be taking a look at how to do this if you are dealing with a spinning reel. First, let’s start with what that is, and we will break down the steps to take to spool that reel efficiently. What is a Spinning Reel? And What is it Good For? These reels are easy to use and are great for the novice angler. The process is simple — you flip the bail, place your finger on the fishing line, and then hurl the line into the water. Then you close down the bail and begin reeling the line back in. This is a great option for fishermen or women who want to use baits lightweight bait like live bait or lures that are made of plastic. The line itself comes off the spool, and it is not fitted with any drag restrictions. This allows for a further casting area. There is also no backlash as well. This is great for large open bodies of water. You can use a spinner reel for any type of fishing from lakes and rivers to the ocean. This is one of the most versatile and user-friendly reel options. Now that you have a deeper understanding of the spinner reel, it is time to break down the process of spooling that reel so that you don’t have to worry about any issues arising while you are out on your latest fishing adventure. Steps to Spool a Spinning Reel There are a few key preparation steps before you even get to the actual spooling stage. Here are all the steps from beginning to end so that you have the complete process stored in mind for when you need it. Choosing the Line There are a lot of different types of line, and even within them, there are different weights and colors. If you intend to use floating bait, then the best option for your reel would be a monofilament. This is a single-strand line that has a lot of stretch. This will increase the flexibility of the line and help with the hooking process. When fishing in shallow waters that have little current, choosing a fluorocarbon may be the way to go because this type of line is hard to see underwater. Reaction to light bites from fish is also felt more. This line can be used efficiently with any type of bait and lures, as well. Lastly, if you are fishing at the bottom of the body of water, then you will want to use a braided line. These are lines that are crafted from multiple strands, which offer the angler a casting distance that is extended. There is no stretch, and it sinks slowly, so it is perfect for top water bait. Load the Reel This process starts with the determination if the reel spins clockwise or counterclockwise. This is simple to figure out by turning the wheel several times. Then you will want to open the bail. Now you will want to string the line you chose through the guides carefully. Then tie the line to the spool with a secure knot. Cut away any extra lines from the knot, so it is clean. Spool the Reel Once the line is attached, you will now close the bail. Now you will pinch the line and carefully begin to turn the reel. While you do this, you should make sure the line is tight and slowly reel the line onto the spool. Make sure to keep an eye out for any twisting of the line and correct as you go. This should be done until the spool is about 1/8th of an inch from the rim of the spool. You want to make sure that you have the right amount of line so that you are set if you need to cut a lire or snag. Once you have this done, you will want to cut the line as close to the spool as possible and secure the end of the line. You can do this with a clip or lure. Final Thoughts With this process, you will ensure that you are set and ready to use that spinner reel to perfection.

Choosing the Line

There are a lot of different types of line, and even within them, there are different weights and colors. If you intend to use floating bait, then the best option for your reel would be a monofilament. This is a single-strand line that has a lot of stretch. This will increase the flexibility of the line and help with the hooking process.

When fishing in shallow waters that have little current, choosing a fluorocarbon may be the way to go because this type of line is hard to see underwater. Reaction to light bites from fish is also felt more. This line can be used efficiently with any type of bait and lures, as well.

Lastly, if you are fishing at the bottom of the body of water, then you will want to use a braided line. These are lines that are crafted from multiple strands, which offer the angler a casting distance that is extended. There is no stretch, and it sinks slowly. It has a high strength compared to size for fishing near underwater structures.

Load the Reel

This process starts with the determination if the reel spins clockwise or counterclockwise. This is simple to figure out by turning the handle several times. Then you will want to open the bail. Now you will want to string the line you chose through the guides carefully. Then tie the line to the spool with a secure knot. Cut away any extra line from the knot, so it is clean.

Spool the Reel

Once the line is attached, you will now close the bail. Now you will pinch the line and carefully begin to turn the reel. While you do this, you should make sure the line is tight and slowly reel the line onto the spool. Make sure to keep an eye out for any twisting of the line and correct as you go.

This should be done until the spool is about 1/8th of an inch from the rim of the spool. You want to make sure that you have the right amount of line so that you are set if you need to cut a lure or snag.

Once you have this done, you will want to cut the line as close to the spool as possible and secure the end of the line. You can do this with a clip or lure.

Final Thoughts

With this process, you will ensure that you are set and ready to use that spinner reel to perfection.

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